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Why should you have a home inspection?

Buying a new home may be the biggest investment you’ll ever make. Although the process is very exciting it quickly becomes overwhelming. While the home you have selected may appear to be just what you’re looking for, how can you be sure there aren’t potentially serious unknown defects which can make your investment a costly one? This is especially true when others in the purchase transaction may be working against your best interests.

Having your home professionally inspected as early as possible in the buying process can save you thousands of dollars on items which you may be able to have the seller or builder correct. ALLVIEW Home Inspections is dedicated to providing you with invaluable information about your new home.


FAQ's

Poor Lot Drainage: 
Improper grading around the exterior of the house causes the majority of wet crawlspaces and basements. Be sure all areas of the home drain water away from the building foundation (6″ in first 10′). Be sure all downspouts are either connected to drain systems or are dumping water sufficiently away from the house with the use of diverter pipes and/or splash blocks. 

Attic Ventilation: 
Most homes have inadequate ventilation. A lot of condensation gathers on the cold side of the insulation during the winter and in the heat build-up in the summer. Roof life is significantly reduced in roofs with inadequate or missing ventilation. 
Roof and Gutters: 
Proper cleaning and treatment, depending on the surrounding trees will put off the need for roof and surrounding wood trim replacement for years. Clean gutters twice a year, after spring flowering and fall leaf drop. 

Earth-To-Wood-Contact: 
In many places around the typical home the wood siding or trim touches, or is close to the ground. This can cause the siding/trim to rot, and allow wood destroying insects to enter. The building code requires six inches between any wood and the ground. Clear dead leaves and shrub trimmings from around the foundation walls. 

Blocked Drains: 
Blocked drains at driveways and the bottom of external stairways can allow rainwater to enter the garage or basement. Keep drain sumps and grilles clean. 

Electrical: 
Alterations by unlicensed handymen can be fatal. Look for exposed electrical tape and incorrect wire or breaker size for the circuit. Never make electrical repairs yourself, and call in an expert if you suspect faulty wiring. 

Furnace: 
Furnaces need regular service and cleaning by a professional. If not, the burners get dirty and run inefficiently, possibly producing carbon monoxide. The wrong burn pattern and subsequent moisture production can cause premature heat exchanger corrosion and failure. 

Tile Bathroom Surrounds: 
Grout is porous and allows moisture to pass unless it has been sealed. Over time the underlying surface (commonly drywall) swells and cracks the grout. The grout cracks allow more water to enter, accelerating the problem. It can cost a lot to replace the tile, and repair the structural damage underneath the tile. Keep grout joints filled and sealed. 

Toilet Wax Rings: 
A wax ring seals the toilet to the drainage system. Over a time period of ten years or more they get brittle. If a toilet becomes loose on the floor, the wax seal can be broken. When they leak they can create a lot of floor/ sub floor damage which is not often noticed until it’s too late. Wax rings look like a donut and cost about $1. They should be changed periodically (and if a toilet is loose). 

Septic Tanks: 
Many septic tanks run satisfactorily for twenty years without pumping, but once the solid layer in the tank builds up to a certain level, the solids will travel down the lines, blocking the field drain. Septic systems can take many years of neglect, but when the solids enter and block the field drain, the system will fail and back up. Septic tanks should be pumped about every three to five years (depending on use) to ensure a healthy system. 

Inspecting a house is a very complex procedure, requiring specialized skills and training. Certified Home Inspectors are trained to methodically and objectively view a house from top to bottom.

Your home is usually your biggest investment. A home inspection helps to assure your investment is a wise and happy one. Being aware of exactly what you are buying can help ease the anxiety associated with purchasing a home. Inspection by an experienced professional will bring you peace of mind.

Even if no problems are found, a home inspection gives you the chance to talk to a knowledgeable professional about your new home, and to ask questions you may have about the operation and maintenance of the house and its systems.

Any purchase agreement for a home should be contingent upon an inspection and the Buyer’s satisfaction as to the condition of the property. Unless the Buyer is very experienced and knowledgeable s/he won’t be able to identify defects, some of which are easily fixed but which can cause significant damage if left unattended, while others are not so evident.

Additionally, most Buyers do not want to crawl around under a house poking at the wood, checking the foundation, and looking for leaky pipes. Home Inspectors do a thorough check inside and out, and give you a detailed written report.

To assist when selling a property it may be helpful to have an inspection prior to putting it on the market. That way a seller minimizes the risk of unpleasant surprises which might cause a lost sale. Also, a good inspector might give you hints and tips to make your property more attractive. Inspectors look at lots of homes – they see which ones sell and they know why.

Professional: 
The work of Certified Home Inspectors is scrutinized by the institutions of which they are members (GAHI, ASHI, etc.). Inspectors are required to obtain continuing education anually to maintain their certifications. Inspectors must adhere to strict codes of ethics.
 
Thorough and Complete: 
Inspections are conducted in accordance with national standards, ensuring a thorough, methodical coverage of the entire dwelling. 

Objective: 
Honest, objective inspections occur because the inspector is impartial to all parties in the transaction, and is not emotionally involved with the house. 

Peace of Mind: 
A small investment in an inspection before committing to a major purchase such as a home may possibly save you thousands of dollars later. It is another layer in the process to improve the chances of getting a well constructed, safe and functional house. 

Personal: 
The buyer is welcome (and encouraged) to attend the inspection. The inspector will spend time with you to explain any points that are uncertain, to provide suggestions on how to correct issues he finds, and give you tips on how best to maintain your new home. 

Documentation: 
At the completion of the inspection (or shortly after), you are presented with a professionally prepared document that covers everything that was inspected. Color pictures are included to emphasize important issues. You can use this document to help in negotiating the repairs or the price of the property. 

  • Even if you know a lot about house construction, HVAC systems, electrical code, plumbing and drainage, you are unlikely to be up-to-date with the latest code requirements. 
  • You are probably not objective because you have a vested interest in the home and you are emotionally involved with the purchase.
  • If you miss something, the few hundred dollars you saved by doing your own inspection could cost you thousands later. Even worse, you could miss a major safety hazard! 

Your home is usually your biggest investment. A home inspection helps to assure your investment is a wise and happy one. Being aware of exactly what you are buying can help ease the anxiety associated with purchasing a home. Inspection by an experienced professional will bring you peace of mind. 

Even if no problems are found, a home inspection gives you the chance to talk to a knowledgeable professional about your new home, and to ask questions you may have about the operation and maintenance of the house and its systems. 

Any purchase agreement for a home should be contingent upon an inspection and the Buyer’s satisfaction as to the condition of the property. Unless the Buyer is very experienced and knowledgeable s/he won’t be able to identify defects, some of which are easily fixed but which can cause significant damage if left unattended, while others are not so evident. 

Additionally, most Buyers do not want to crawl around under a house poking at the wood, checking the foundation, and looking for leaky pipes. Home Inspectors do a thorough check inside and out, and give you a detailed written report. 

To assist when selling a property it may be helpful to have an inspection prior to putting it on the market. That way a seller minimizes the risk of unpleasant surprises which might cause a lost sale. Also, a good inspector might give you hints and tips to make your property more attractive. Inspectors look at lots of homes – they see which ones sell and they know why.